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Jack the Giant Killer yAnd now work as a financial advisor out West My job used to be to analyze policy proposals and new regulations Now I work in the financial industryAnyway I ve decided thisear to try and read three or four nonfiction book on the financial industry I started with Bad Paper read this one and will hopefully get to Dark Money and The Money Cult before the end of the A Day in the Budwig Diet yearIn this book Professor Baradaran lays out the theoretical and historical basis for a public option the US Post Office to serve the large segment of the American populace that is underserved read this book andou will be shocked by just how underserved AND just how many by traditional banks and credit unions This large segment is often preyed upon by the payday lending and check cashing industries which from my own vantage point are industries that add very few positives to the US economy As we see income disparity grow and the poor disenfranchised not just from civic life and political participation but also banking we are sowing the seeds of trouble for our democracy This book carefully lays out the problems the history solutions of the past current alternatives and roadblocks to change and points to probably the most viable policy option Given the nature of Congress polarization and inability to act on some of the most basic responsibilities of governing I don t hold much hope of change in the near future But as demographic changes swell the underserved as certain parties like banks continue to shrink their tent at some point there might be enough energy and support for real public option banking reform And at that point this book will be VERY importantProfessor Baradaran is not Michael Lewis She didn t weave her book into the life of some fascinating character that drives the narrative through the channels of postal banking One of the byproducts of the Michael Lewis era of financial reporting is there is this unspoken expectation of the sexy and the sensational There needs to be narrative arcs and glitter and perhaps even a banker in a strip club I m saying that only partially in jest The reality is that form of reporting has its place and certainly is enjoyable And while I often love Lewis ability to dance through a financial derivative with a bit of prep school swagger and keep his audience semi erect during a lesson on dark pools most banking policy AND most banking issues are by design not meant to be read on the beach or seen on the Big Screen Mehrsa is not writing New New Journalism This book won t get optioned for a movie Sorry Mehrsa This is a book that ends with 86 pages of notes That is one page of notes for about 3 pages of text This is a well crafted scholarly peer reviewed piece Her logic arguments and writing are tight Tight The pieces of this book seem to fit like some Incan stonemason s master puzzle No Mortar No knifable clefts Solid and clean This book is at heart a policy brief But here is the analogy I used with my wife last night There is a story about Velvet Underground s first album told by Brian Eno While Velvet Underground and Nico sold only 30000 copies in its early Lambs To The Slaughter years everyone who bought one of those 30000 copies started a band This book is NOT destined to compete with a Michael Lewis bestseller It won t get optioned But like money deposited in a bank with a very low reserve rate some books and some albums are big idea multipliers And who knows perhaps everybody who reads this book will also start a bandAlso ifou read this book ou should also check out the Post Office Inspector General s white paper Providing Non Bank Financial Services for the Underserved This is an intriguing book and I was ready to give it high marks until the final chapter In fact for a general history of banking options for low and moderate income bank customers as well as an excellent overview of how banking has changed and why this is a great book In How the Other "Half Banks the author Mehrsa Baradaran proposes the creation of a postal savings bank that would be a " Banks the author Mehrsa Baradaran proposes the creation of a postal savings bank that would be a costhigh tolerance banking option for low income participants Good idea but she doesn t seem to have a firm grasp on the administrative and performance problems facing the postal service In her summary chapter A Public Option in Banking some of her assertions caused me to uestion her objectivity On page 217 she writes Public Option in Banking some of her assertions caused me to uestion her objectivity On page 217 she writes one reason the Post Office is a logical choice to provide banking services to the underserved is because the post office is not an institution motivated by profit making Does the author not read the news The profitability or the lack of of the Postal Service has been in the news for ears It cannot be denied and the Postal Service has even acknowledged that they cannot compete with the private sector absent additional support from the government and increased revenues in the form of ever increasing stamp costs The Postal Services profitability is at the center of the struggle to survive in the 21st century Consider this comment from Forbes in 2013 The United States Postal Service has run up 4 billion in losses so far This Year On Top Of year on top of ear s 159 billion deficit Congress is considering legislation to rearrange the deck chairs on the postal Titanic The only solution is for Washington to get out of the mail business In another example the author makes the statement p 218 that the post office is the crowded and bustling place where the neighborhood gathers to do its business Yes in 1950 in Mayberry but hardly so now As someone who still regularly uses and prizes the Postal Service I can attest that the post offices near me and near my office are near dead zones hardly a person to be found While that might change if they provided banking services their current level of busyness my word is not as the author suggests a fact based upon my own experience as a customer Is there a need for the type of banking service she describes Absolutely but it seemed to me that the author s desire to prove her point may have caused her to overlook the many real problems the Postal Services faces To encourage low income citizens to rely on a government agency already on the ropes doesn t seem like a really good option at all will have to read this eventually To repeat the credit union industry created to serve the poor now fought against a law reuiring it to serve the poor And I have always favored Credit Unions due to their mandate to serve This book was really a greatly expanded law review article that followed the standard formula Introduction General Background Discussion of the Issue Proscription Fortunately knowing that allowed me to uickly skim through the general background possibly interesting but not the reason I got the book to get to the issue By the end I was thoroughly convinced of the plight of the poor and their abandonment by traditional banking institutions However I left unconvinced that a return to the postal banking system was a worthwhile policy objective While certainly it could be beneficial it seemed that Prof Baradaran s argument was based on her inherent biases and less on having thought the argument through For example she seemed to make the argument that postal banking could return the post office to break evenprofitability and then basically said or if not then the government could bail them out like it bailed out other banks It s the least they could do to bring eual banking access to the poor Overall this book was very insightful as to the issues involved if not so much for the proposed solutio. Ility They abandoned less profitable low income customers in favor of wealthier clients and high ield investments Fringe lenders stepped in to fill the void This two tier banking system has become even uneual since the 2008 financial crisisBaradaran proposes a solution reenlisting the US Post Office in its historic function of providing bank services The post office played an important but largely forgotten role in the creation of American democracy and it could be deployed again to level the field of financial opportuni. ,
Would all be taken care ofThat s because I didn t know very much As Mersha Baradaran explains in her much needed book How the Other Half Banks everything about this loan and hundreds of thousands like them was completely legal The dumbfoundedness that I felt when I found this out became the lens through which I read and processed the book How the Other Half Banks is not a long book but it is a book that does a number of things all of them important to its overall argument In the first place it is a history of banking in the United States going back to Hamilton s first national bank and then looking at Andrew Jackson s bank wars the nineteenth century s ramp up of the banking industry and a variety of bank types that emerged in the 20th century to try to address the banking needs of poor and lower middle class AmericansThis is not a general history though It has a very specific point Baradaran demonstrates uite conclusively in my view that the banking industry has never been governed purely by market forces nor could it ever be It cannot exist without certain types of market skewing interventions by the federal government This is not incidental It is a constitutive part of what banks do They have to have an enormous amount of trust People have to be completely confident giving them their money And only government backing has the power to generate this kind of trustThis is crucial to the second thing that Baradaran does which is explain the very serious problem of subprime predatory lending These are the payday loan companies the auto title loan firms and other institutions that extend credit to people who need fairly small amounts of money and do not have any other option These companies have built a business model around charging exorbitant interest rates on relatively small loans for short amounts of time that keep getting extended and extended as people have difficulty making the repaymentsBaradaran further demonstrates that the two primary ways that society has tried to deal with these predatory lending practices education and regulation have not and cannot work People cannot be educated out of taking these loans because they are not an irrational response to the situations that people find themselves in The people who take out these loans generally know exactly what they are getting themselves into and they do it anyway because they have an immediate financial need that they cannot meet This is also the reason that regulation does not work These lenders fill a real market niche and as long as this is the case they will reinvent themselves every time they are regulated and come back in a form that fills the need There is no way to get rid of them as long as there are people who need credit and can t get it anywhere elseAnd this is the third and ultimately the most important thing that Baradaran does in How the Other Half Banks she makes the argument that there needs to be a public credit option some way that the government can use its resources to facilitate credit at interest rates that reflect the actual market value of that credit Such an option would not be an entitlement program A great deal of data shows that it could be self sustaining But it would not be predatory which would translate into saving hundreds of thousands of people from bankruptcy and financial ruinThere are plenty of objections to this kind of proposal Most of them come from the Ayn Rand Book of Libertarian Fantasies it is socialism the government shouldn t pick winners and losers the federal government shouldn t have that much power it will run up the deficit it is massive government interference with the free marketBut Baradaran has already anticipated all of these objections with her first two chapters which demonstrate with overwhelming evidence that banking is not and has never been a free market enterprise There are government interventions propping up all of the normal lenders and even when they fail they don t fail because both Democratic and Republican institutions intervene to keep them solvent To do otherwise would jeopardize the confidence upon which the entire banking industry depends People who use traditional banks benefit from government interventions into the market on a daily basisTraditional banks are based on a kind of socialism that never made it into Atlas Shrugged the socialization of risk We all bear the financial cost of the government s interventions to prop up too big to fail banks Those costs are real elements of the free market euation This is not a complaint There are perfectly good reasons that banks need the stabilizing power of the federal government even though the exercise of this stabilizing passes risk and eventually cost onto the taxpayerBut it is disingenuous to then turn around and suggest that the people who can t afford to use one of the subsidized risk socializing banks must submit to the forces of an unregulated free market They are literally the only ones who must do so in their banking choicesIn the penultimate chapter Baradaran suggests that the US Postal Service could offer these banking services As I read it though this is less of a proposal than an illustration of how it could work The proposal is that we as a society acting through the mechanism of our government need to do something America s status as a democracy is jeopardized by the fundamentally uneual access to credit that is created when rich people have access to credit subsidies and poor people don t And I agree A non market driven public option for credit is the only way to assure the basic euality of opportunity that our nation is supposed to stand for BANKING AS A SOCIAL JUSTICE ISSUE I had no idea This book helped me understand both why payday lenderspredatory lending practices exist why their services are currently necessary but how we can better meet the banking needs of the poor without being exploitative I also understand the politics and reasoning behind the recent bank bailouts much better and how the industry of banking has evolved It was so so interesting despite being really outside my normal wheelhouse but I thoroughly enj Full review hereYou can t get through Professor Baradaran s book without becoming informed Over the last half decade or so a lot has been written about the financial crisis And Professor Baradaran has made a worthy contribution to this crisis Library She Doesn T Spend She doesn t spend lot of time retreading what I ve seen in other books she doesn t really trace the machinations associated with determining whether to save the banks and which banks to save or the details of the financial instruments that blew up or much of the current intrigueInstead s If one of Slate (Rebel Wayfarers MC, your brethren becomes poor and falls into poverty amongou then ou shall help him You shall not lend Him Your Money For your money for Leviticus 25 35 37I should disclose right upfront that I know and am friends probably closer to acuaintances since we share several friends and geography prevents us from actually breaking physical bread with Mehrsa But she didn t give me the book I bought the HB version of her book and the audio version as well because I was genuinely interested in these subjects Financial policy is one of my hobbyhorses and the literature JR The Big Short Flash Boys Cosmopolis The Bonfire of the Vanities etc both fiction and nonfiction that surrounds money I find super interesting Some of this is probably due to my background I started off my working life as a policy analyst in an eastern state. The 1970s and continues decades laterIn an age of corporate megabanks with trillions of dollars in assets it is easy to forget that America s banking system was originally created as a public service Banks have always relied on credit from the federal government provided on favorable terms so that they could issue low interest loans But as banks grew in size and political influence they shed their social contract with the American people demanding to be treated as a private industry free from any public serving responsib. This book is an excellent primer on the history of banking in the United States as well as a compelling argument for a significant political proposal I read this book with a couple of different brains One was the brain of a girl who grew up middle class poor and experienced a lot of the instability Baradaran describes among the unbanked or working poor In my understanding of our family s struggles lack of credit was never a consciously felt harm When we were strapped for cash we never wondered how to get a loan or went to a payday lender we either got help from our family or we got evicted If there had been an option to go to the post office and get a 300 loan to make rent this month would we have used that Would that have helped If my single mom had atrocious credit would we have been eligible In my version of poverty the philosophy was ALWAYS to find some way to go without rather than incurring any debt but I realize now as an adult that debt is a key path to many for building enormous fortunes I m left with a uestion is debt ever anything but a death sentence for the poor The answer to most of these uestions is I don t know My poor person brain sees this whole notion of providing easier safer access to credit to the poor as just a tiny band aid on the problem of poverty and lands me back at the conclusion that fighting capital directly through organizing workers is the best bet the working class in this country has Postal banking seems like it would be a helpful addition but not a vehicle for structural change The other brain I used to read this book though was my history major political brain and that brain just ate it up Chapter 2 History of the Social Contract between the banking industry and the state should be reuired reading for every high school student of US history I was a history nerd and still my eyes glazed over in every discussion of Hamilton and Jefferson and their fight about the establishment of a national bank and what exactly the Federal Reserve does etc etc Baradaran does an amazing job of opening up that history and making it accessible to non banker types Not just accessible Enjoyable And she makes a very compelling case that our current era from the 1980s on is a dramatic departure from anything else we ve seen in the history of this country in terms of banking and the state With this brain this topic seems huge and important This seems like a deep and invisible seam running through the whole story of economic ineuality in this society a shadow we need to bring to lightThis book is without a doubt hugely important Baradaran brings a dogged focus to the needs of the poor in a book about banking this alone is refreshing I almost want a seuel to get a detailed about some of the issues she raised She mentions that Technology and market changes came first before the avalanche of deregulation Perhaps it was outside the purview of this book but I want that broken down what kinds of changes How is this connected to the widescale globalization of the US manufacturing economy and the all out war on organized labor Baradaran makes a point to mention how different eras of banking interacted with race but the examples she mentions briefly just raise uestions for me and leave me wanting a whole book on that topic Good news for me I believe the author is currently writing that book I ve always deliberately chosen to do business with a credit union over a bank and this book diminished some of my optimism around that I d love a whole extra chapter devoted to the current day state of the credit union movement and how they compare to banks I loved how firmly Baradaran insisted that access to credit was not just an economic issue but an issue that spoke to the overall health of our democracy I would have LOVED to hear from her about how the concentration of capital threatens political democracy How the Other Half Banks provides an amazing survey of a lot of interconnected complicated issues and I think it s Informative exploration of how the poor are forced to rely on abusive fringe lenders such as payday lenders and how lack of access to mainstream forms of credit ends up being extremely expensive Also has a good historical background on the institutions that used to supply banking services to the used to supply banking services to the though I wanted some numbers how many people were unbanked or underbanked when those institutions were around I had a harder time with the solution proposed namely a revival of postal banking the post office used to provide deposit services but it doesn t appear that it ever provided credit and that seems to my eye beyond the post office s competence I can believe that there needs to be a public option for small dollar loans but I M Not Sure The Post Office m not sure the post office the right answer At any rate it s worth a read There are payday loan store fronts than Starbuck and McDonalds combined The average payday borrower profile is a white woman who is divorced or separated does not have a college degree and is between twenty five and forty four ears old The average unbanked family with an annual income of around 25000 spends about 2400 per Do I Owe You Money? The Collected Memoirs of Ian Mosley year almost 10 percent of its income on financial transactions This book can lullou with its textbook like prose and then drop one of these incredible facts in that almost slips by unnoticed And these are why the book is compelling The great unbanked are a compelling story It s focus is another example of private businesses rejecting the unprofitable aka poor clients But Banks deal in credit And pursuing happiness without access to credit is incredibly hard And Baradaran approaches this problem with an understanding of both the history of how we got here and the present we find ourselves in She s not asking BoA to open new branches and She s not asking BoA to open new branches and fees although that overdraft fee is fairly miserly But let s stop blaming the unbanked People don t get payday loans because they are dumb they get them because they are desperate and there are no other options And the Banks are powerful They stopped WalMart from getting a bank Walmart is the skinniest pig at the financial profit trough The book s big reveal of POSTAL BANKING is almost a desperate plea because how many people are ready for the sentence The answer can be found at the Post Office There is another story here about how the GOP has tried to destroy the USPS and how the public s perception of the Post Office has changed Maybe Nader will write that if it hasn t been written already About five EL SUTIL ARTE DE QUE (CASI TODO) TE IMPORTE UNA MIERDA (HARPERCOLLINS) years ago I got my first introduction to the world of payday loans when as an ecclesiastical assignment I was asked to work with several individuals and families who were struggling with finances One of these families was making payments of 200 a month or so on a loan that had been taken out severalears earlier I uickly calculated that the individual had payed around 5000 already on this loan which I assumed had to have been fairly substantial It was not I later discovered It was originally a loan for 700 dollars which had been needed to fix a car without which nobody in the family could have workedI was of course outraged But I assumed that it had to be some sort of illegal loan shark operation We were looking at an interest rate of over 100% a ear and they were no closer to paying off the loan than they had been when they started All they ever paid was interest I made a few phone calls thinking that all I had to do was report whoever held the loan to some law enforcement agency or another and it. The United States has two separate banking systems today one serving the well to do and another exploiting everyone else How the Other Half Banks contributes to the growing conversation on American ineuality by highlighting one of its prime causes uneual credit Mehrsa Baradaran examines how a significant portion of the population deserted by banks is forced to wander through a Wild West of payday lenders and check cashing services to cover emergency expenses and pay for necessities all thanks to deregulation that began in.

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How the Other Half Banks


10 thoughts on “Read Download How the Other Half Banks – steamlite.co.uk

  1. says: Read Download How the Other Half Banks – steamlite.co.uk

    download How the Other Half Banks Mehrsa Baradaran × 3 characters Read Download How the Other Half Banks – steamlite.co.uk If one of your brethren becomes poor and falls into poverty among you then you shall help him You shall not len

  2. says: download How the Other Half Banks Mehrsa Baradaran × 3 characters review Á eBook or Kindle ePUB × Mehrsa Baradaran

    download How the Other Half Banks Read Download How the Other Half Banks – steamlite.co.uk Mehrsa Baradaran × 3 characters About five years ago I got my first introduction to the world of payday loans when as an ecclesiastical assignment I was asked to work with several individuals and families who were struggling with finances One of these families was making paym

  3. says: Read Download How the Other Half Banks – steamlite.co.uk

    Read Download How the Other Half Banks – steamlite.co.uk review Á eBook or Kindle ePUB × Mehrsa Baradaran download How the Other Half Banks This book is an excellent primer on the history of banking in the United States as well as a compelling argument for a significant political proposal I read this book with a couple of different brains One was the brain of a girl who grew up middle class poor and experienced a lot of the instability Baradaran describes among the unbanked or working poor In my understanding of our family's struggles lack of credit was nev

  4. says: Mehrsa Baradaran × 3 characters review Á eBook or Kindle ePUB × Mehrsa Baradaran Read Download How the Other Half Banks – steamlite.co.uk

    Read Download How the Other Half Banks – steamlite.co.uk This is an intriguing book and I was ready to give it high marks until the final chapter In fact for a general history of banking options for low and moderate income bank customers as well as an excellent overview of how banking has changed and why this is a great book In “How the Other Half Banks” the author Mehrsa Baradaran proposes

  5. says: download How the Other Half Banks Read Download How the Other Half Banks – steamlite.co.uk review Á eBook or Kindle ePUB × Mehrsa Baradaran

    Mehrsa Baradaran × 3 characters Read Download How the Other Half Banks – steamlite.co.uk BANKING AS A SOCIAL JUSTICE ISSUE I had no idea This book helped me understand both why payday lenderspredatory le

  6. says: Read Download How the Other Half Banks – steamlite.co.uk Mehrsa Baradaran × 3 characters download How the Other Half Banks

    Read Download How the Other Half Banks – steamlite.co.uk Informative exploration of how the poor are forced to rely on abusive fringe lenders such as payday lenders and how lack of access to mainstream forms of credit ends up being extremely expensive Also has a good historical background on the institutions that used to supply banking services to the poor though I wanted some numbers

  7. says: Read Download How the Other Half Banks – steamlite.co.uk review Á eBook or Kindle ePUB × Mehrsa Baradaran download How the Other Half Banks

    Mehrsa Baradaran × 3 characters Read Download How the Other Half Banks – steamlite.co.uk will have to read this eventually To repeat the credit union industry created to serve the poor now fought against a law reuiring it to serve the poor”And I have always favored Credit Unions due to their mandate to serve

  8. says: Read Download How the Other Half Banks – steamlite.co.uk

    Read Download How the Other Half Banks – steamlite.co.uk Mehrsa Baradaran × 3 characters Full review hereYou can’t get through Professor Baradaran’s book without becoming informed Over the last half decade or so a lot has been written about the financial crisis And Professor Baradaran has made a worthy contribution to this crisis library She doesn’t spend a lot of time retreading what I’ve seen in other books

  9. says: download How the Other Half Banks Mehrsa Baradaran × 3 characters review Á eBook or Kindle ePUB × Mehrsa Baradaran

    Mehrsa Baradaran × 3 characters review Á eBook or Kindle ePUB × Mehrsa Baradaran download How the Other Half Banks “There are payday loan store fronts than Starbuck and McDonalds combined”“The average payday borrower profile is a wh

  10. says: Read Download How the Other Half Banks – steamlite.co.uk review Á eBook or Kindle ePUB × Mehrsa Baradaran Mehrsa Baradaran × 3 characters

    download How the Other Half Banks review Á eBook or Kindle ePUB × Mehrsa Baradaran Mehrsa Baradaran × 3 characters This book was really a greatly expanded law review article that followed the standard formula Introduction General Background Discussion of the Issue Proscription Fortunately knowing that allowed me to uickly skim

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